Re-Release Tuesdays “Ready Or Not”

fugees

The album, the singles, the time.  Great time for hip-hop. Glad that I had the opportunity to see them perform before they blew up. You want to talk about classics? Regardless of what you may feel about them individually, they worked as a group.  This week’s Re-Release is  Fugees “Ready Or Not“.

The Fugees translated an intriguing blend of jazz-rap, R&B, and reggae into huge success during the mid-’90s, when the trio’s sophomore album The Score hit number one on the pop charts and sold over five million copies. The trio formed in the late ’80s in the New Jersey area, where Lauryn Hill andPrakazrel Michel (“Pras“) attended a local high school and began working together. Michel‘s cousin Wyclef Jean (“Clef“) joined the group (then calledthe Tranzlator Crew), and the trio signed to Ruffhouse/Columbia in 1993. After renaming themselves The Fugees (a term of derision, short for refugees, which was usually used to describe Haitian immigrants). Though the group’s debut album, Blunted on Reality, was quite solid, it reflected a prevailing gangsta stance that may have been forced by the record label. ” – Allmusic.com

SPECIAL DELIVERY: The Voice

Gangstarr

Gangstarr had a song that spoke about how the uniqueness in your voice is one of the things that got you attention in hip-hop. A distinct voice is just as important as a distinct style (i.e. Q-Tip, B-Real, Kendrick).  Sure there have been rappers with similar vocal tones but, in 2013/2014, I feel like there are waaay too many.

Each rapper brings something to the table that separates him or herself from the other.  It’s just hard to tell when they sound so much a like.  They target the same audience.  Somebody’s not going to eat. It  doesn’t matter who came first, they all came up together.

I was listening to Childish Gambino’s new album when this became ever so clear. Nothing against him but he sound/feels like Drake, Big Sean, & Lupe Fiasco all rolled in one. Maybe that’s the hook? IDK. It becomes increasingly hard to tell the difference for the uninformed.

Nobody has bass in their voice? Only in interviews? I don’t understand. Unfortunately, it all comes down to the marketing of this style. Everybody wants what is charting. Once upon a time artist would get signed because they had a  unique sound.  Now they get deals because they sound the same.

I will always remember Russell Simmons saying he didn’t sign Nas back in the day because he sound too much like Kool G. Rap.  If that were today, not only would he have signed him, he probably would have a roster full of them.

It all just sends a uninspired message to the up and coming hip-hop artist. “Why be you when you can be them?”

Here is that Gangstarr song I talked about (side bar- I didn’t like it but it’s the truth. Lol!):

Re-Release Tuesdays “It Ain’t Hard To Tell”

NasIllmatic

It’s snowing here on the east coast and I couldn’t think of anything better for this Tuesday.  Basically,  I thought the snow scene in this video was dope back in the day.  It also helps that this is the lead single off of iLLmatic.  Nothing more to be said. This week’s Re-Release is Nas’s “It Ain’t Hard To Tell“.

Often cited as one of the best hip-hop albums of the ’90s, Illmatic is the undisputed classic upon which Nas’ reputation rests. It helped spearhead the artistic renaissance of New York hip-hop in the post-Chronic era, leading a return to street aesthetics. Yet even if Illmatic marks the beginning of a shift away from Native Tongues-inspired alternative rap, it’s strongly rooted in that sensibility. For one, Nas employs some of the most sophisticated jazz-rap producers around: Q-Tip, Pete Rock, DJ Premier, and Large Professor, who underpin their intricate loops with appropriately tough beats… ” – Allmusic.com